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What Is The Difference Between "straight Probation" and "deferred Adjudication Probation"?

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ABOUT DEFENDING YOUR CASE

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "STRAIGHT PROBATION" AND "DEFERRED ADJUDICATION PROBATION"?

With "straight probation," even if you successfully complete the probationary period, you are considered to have been convicted of the offense for which you have been placed on probation. On the other hand, if you are placed on "deferred adjudication probation" and successfully complete the probationary period, the charge against you is dismissed and there is no conviction.

Some lawyers tell clients that if they complete "deferred adjudication probation" they will not have "a record." This is not exactly true. There will be "a record" that you entered a plea to the charge and were put on "deferred adjudication probation" and this can have an effect for such things as applying for a permit to carry a weapon or calculating your criminal history in federal court. Still, you will not have "a conviction" and can truthfully answer "no" on job applications and alike if asked if you have ever been "convicted" of an offense.

If you are placed on "straight probation," you are sentenced to a particular term in jail or prison and that term is probated for a particular period (for example, a sentence of 180 days probated for two years is a possible sentence for a first time DWI conviction). If you then violate "straight probation" and the probation is revoked, you can be incarcerated up to the original jail or prison term that was imposed (in the above DWl example, your sentence would be up to 180 days in jail if your probation was revoked). If you are placed on "deferred adjudication probation," you are not sentenced to a particular jail or prison term at the time the "deferred adjudication probation" is imposed. If you violate the "deferred adjudication probation" and the probation is revoked, the judge may sentence you to any term provided by law at the time of the revocation.

There are certain offenses (e.g. driving while intoxicated) for which a judge cannot grant "deferred adjudication probation," although the judge can still grant "straight probation." Likewise, there are certain offenses for which a judge cannot grant "straight probation," although the judge can still grant "deferred adjudication probation."

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